US Regulators Authorize COVID-19 Vaccines for Children as Young as 6 Months of Age

U.S. regulators on June 17 authorized two COVID-19 vaccines for young children.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) granted emergency authorization for the Moderna and Pfizer COVID-19 vaccines for children as young as 6 months old.

Previously, only children 5 and up could get the Pfizer vaccine, and only people 18 and older could get Moderna’s jab.

The FDA’s move came two days after its vaccine advisory panel unanimously voted to recommend regulators grant emergency authorization for the shots.

“I do believe that the benefits far outweigh the risks involved,” Dr. Michael Nelson, one of the panel members, said after the votes. “Families will now have choice that they did not have before and I fully believe in the intelligence of families to make the right choice for their families and children.”

Authorization has a lower evidentiary bar than approval, and is only possible because U.S. authorities have maintained a COVID-19 emergency designation despite cases, hospitalizations, and deaths linked to the disease plunging since the metrics hit fresh peaks in January.

The efficacy of Moderna’s vaccine against infection was pegged at 50.6 percent for children 6 months through 23 months of age and 36.8 percent for children aged 2 to 5. The efficacy of Pfizer’s vaccine was estimated at 80.3 percent across the age groups. The estimates were drawn from clinical trials run by the companies.

For young children, the Moderna vaccine efficacy estimates were based on just 490 children and the Pfizer efficacy estimates were based on just 220 children.

Epoch Times Photo
Vials of Moderna’s COVID-19 vaccine on a table in a vaccination clinic in San Rafael, Calif., on April 6, 2022. (Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

No estimates were possible for protection against severe illness—which is the primary reason officials say to get vaccinated because the protection has waned considerably as new virus variants emerge—because of the low numbers of severe cases among vaccinated and unvaccinated volunteers.

“Many parents, caregivers and clinicians have been waiting for a vaccine for younger children and this action will help protect those down to 6 months of age. As we have seen with older age groups, we expect that the vaccines for younger children will provide protection from the most severe outcomes of COVID-19, such as hospitalization and death,” FDA Commissioner Robert Califf said in a statement.

“As with all vaccines for any population, when authorizing COVID-19 vaccines intended for pediatric age groups, the FDA ensures that our evaluation and analysis of the data is rigorous and thorough,” added Dr. Peter Marks, a top official at the agency.

Some outside experts have questioned the data from the trials.

“From an efficacy standpoint, it makes absolutely no sense to approve these products,” Brian Hooker, chief scientific officer for Children’s Health Defense, told The Epoch Times before the authorization.

Others urged the FDA to grant the authorization requests, asserting the data indicated sufficient protection.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is meeting with its vaccine advisory panel on Friday and Saturday to discuss the data. The panel will decide whether to advise the CDC to say young kids should, or may, get the vaccines. The panel could also recommend the vaccines should only be administered to kids with serious health problems, like diabetes.

CDC Director Rochelle Walensky then makes the final decision.

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